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Ocean Life
  
Killer Whalesby Fremlin on Flickr

  • Orcas or Killer Whale live 30 to 50 years in the wild.
  • Orcas are animals that travel in groups called pods.
  • Pods usually consist of 5 to 30 whales, although some pods may combine to form a group of 100 or more. 
  • Orca pods often work together to catch a meal. 
  • Pods sometimes will force many fish into one area and take turns feeding or will beach (slide out of the water onto the shore) themselves to scare seals or penguins into the water where other whales are waiting to feed.
  • Orcas feed on fish, squid, birds, and marine mammals.
  • Like dolphins, orcas use echolocation - bouncing sound off of objects to determine their location - to hunt and use a series of high-pitched clicks to stun prey.
Offspring

  • A calf is born in autumn weighing almost 400 pounds and measuring up to 7 feet in length.
  • A calf will remain with its mother for at least two years.

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Sea Turtleby NOAA's National Ocean Service on Flickr

  • Sea Turtles, depending on the type, can live from 50 to 80 years in the wild.
  • Unlike other turtles, sea turtles cannot retract their legs and head into their shells.
  • They come in many sizes as well as many colors.
  • They are categorized as reptiles as they are cold blooded.
  • Sea turtles are found in all warm and temperate waters throughout the world and migrate hundreds of miles between nesting and feeding grounds.
  • Most sea turtles undergo long migrations, some as far as 1400 miles, between their feeding grounds and the beaches where they nest.

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Feeding the dolphins!by colleenpence on Flickr

Dolphins

  • Good communicators
  • Very intelligent
  • Excellent swimmers and can leap and jump out of the water.
  • Work in teams
  • Lots of stories of dolphins helping people

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Manta Ray Cleaning Stationby NOAA's National Ocean Service on Flickr

Manta Ray

  • Graceful, have been seen playing by 'flying' out of the water. Sometimes to impress another ray!
  • Harmless to humans
  • Feeds on plankton
  •  Often travels alone but sometimes seen in a group.

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Sea Lion: Up Close and Personalby NOAA's National Ocean Service on Flickr

Seals

 

  •  Curious creatures, often found following boats to see what's happening!
  •  Highly intelligent animals
  •  May dive up to 1,000 feet to the ocean bottom to find food
  • Can hold breath for nearly 2 hours underwater by conserving oxygen
  • Hunt on their own or in small groups
  • The collective name for a group is a herd, pod or for female groups, harems
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    Japanese Spider Crabby scubadive67 on Flickr

    Crab

    • 10-legged animals that walk sideways.
    • Most crabs live in the oceans, but many, like the robber crab, live on land.
    • Invertebrates i.e animals without a backbone. 
    • Have an exoskeleton, an outer shell that both protects them from predators and provides support.
    • Marine crabs breathe underwater using gills, which are located in a two cavities under the carapace. True land crabs have enlarged, modified cavities that act like lungs so that the land crabs can breathe air.

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    Hi, There!by Peter Kaminski on Flickr

    Starfish

    • Are not fish
    • Do not have gills, scales, or fins like fish
    • Move quite differently from fish. While fish propel themselves with their tails, starfish have tiny tube feet to help them move along
    • Have spines covering their upper surface and a soft underside.
    • Do not have blood
    • If they lose an 'arm' they can grow another one.

     

     

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    しながわ水族館_SHINAGAWA AQUARIUM_072by ajari on Flickr

    Clownfish

    • Has adapted to not be hurt by sea anenome's sting. 
    • Due to their small size, clown fish are preyed upon by a number of predators but can be difficult to catch as they often retreat into the safety of the sea anemone.
    • Female clown fish can lay hundreds or thousands of eggs at a time depending on the species. 
    • Male clown fish guards the eggs until they hatch just over a week later
    • Clown fish are omnivorous animals 
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    Red Sea Octopusby prilfish on Flickr

    Octopus

    • Excellent eyesight
    • Mothers guard the eggs fiercely until they hatch. 
    • Clever at looking after themselves - they have lots of ways of getting away from predators.

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    Dansa dels reidiby rakfb on Flickr

    Seahorses

    • Mother lays eggs
    • Father keeps them in his pouch until they hatch
    • When they hatch they get into groups with other baby seahorses and stay together to keep safe.
    • Graceful in the water
    • Calm and peaceful

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